Tag Archives: retraction

It’s #overlyhonestmethods come to life!

Retraction Watch reports a study of microarray data sharing. The article, published in Clinical Chemistry, is itself behind a paywall despite trumpeting the virtues of open data. So straight to the Open Access Irony Award group at CiteULike it goes.

I was not surprised to learn that the rate of public deposition of data is low, nor that most deposited data ignores standards and much of it is low quality. What did catch my eye though, was a retraction notice for one of the articles from the study, in which the authors explain the reason for retraction.
Read the rest…

Reproducibility: releasing code is just part of the solution

This week in Retraction Watch: Hypertension retracts paper over data glitch.

The retraction notice describes the “data glitch” in question (bold emphasis added by me):

…the authors discovered an error in the code for analyzing the data. The National Health and Nutrition
Examination Survey (NHANES) medication data file had multiple observations per participant and
was merged incorrectly with the demographic and other data files. Consequently, the sample size was
twice as large as it should have been (24989 instead of 10198). Therefore, the corrected estimates of
the total number of US adults with hypertension, uncontrolled hypertension, and so on, are significantly
different and the percentages are slightly different.

Let’s leave aside the observation that 24989 is not 2 x 10198. I tweeted:

Not that simple though, is it? Read on for the Twitter discussion.
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PMRetract: now with rake tasks

Bioinformaticians (and anyone else who programs) love effective automation of mundane tasks. So it may amuse you to learn that I used to update PMRetract, my PubMed retraction notice monitoring application, by manually running the following steps in order:

  1. Run query at PubMed website with term “Retraction of Publication[Publication Type]”
  2. Send results to XML file
  3. Run script to update database with retraction and total publication counts for years 1977 – present
  4. Run script to update database with retraction notices
  5. Run script to update database with retraction timeline
  6. Commit changes to git
  7. Push changes to Github
  8. Dump local database to file
  9. Restore remote database from file
  10. Restart Heroku application

I’ve been meaning to wrap all of that up in a Rakefile for some time. Finally, I have. Along the way, I learned something about using efetch from BioRuby and re-read one of my all-time favourite tutorials, on how to write rake tasks. So now, when I receive an update via RSS, updating should be as simple as:

rake pmretract

In other news: it’s been quiet here, hasn’t it? I recently returned from 4 weeks overseas, packed up my office and moved to a new building. Hope to get back to semi-regular posts before too long.

Monitoring PubMed retractions: updates

chart

PubMed cumulative retractions 1977-present

There’s been a recent flurry of interest in retractions. See for example: Scientific Retractions: A Growth Industry?; summarised also by GenomeWeb in Take That Back; articles in the WSJ and the Pharmalot blog; and academic articles in the Journal of Medical Ethics and Infection & Immunity.

Several of these sources cite data from my humble web application, PMRetract. So now seems like a good time to mention that:

  • The application is still going strong and is updated regularly
  • I’ve added a few enhancements to the UI; you can follow development at GitHub
  • I’ve also added a long-overdue about page with some extra information, including the fact that I wrote it :)

Now I just need to fix up my Git repositories. Currently there’s one which pushes to GitHub and a second, with a copy of the Sinatra code for pushing to Heroku, which isn’t too smart.

Monitoring PubMed retractions: a Heroku-hosted Sinatra application

In a previous post analysing retractions from PubMed, I wrote:

It strikes me that it would be relatively easy to build a web application (Rails, Heroku), which constantly monitors retraction data at PubMed and generates a variety of statistics and charts.

“Relatively easy” it was. Let me introduce you to PMRetract, my first publicly-available web application.
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Analysis of retractions in PubMed

As so often happens these days, a brief post at FriendFeed got me thinking about data analysis. Entitled “So how many retractions are there every year, anyway?”, the post links to this article at Retraction Watch. It discusses ways to estimate the number of retractions and in particular, a recent article in the Journal of Medical Ethics (subscription only, sorry) which addresses the issue.

As Christina pointed out in a comment at Retraction Watch, there are thousands of scientific journals of which PubMed indexes only a fraction. However, PubMed is relatively easy to analyse using a little Ruby and R. So, here we go…
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