Virus hosts from NCBI taxonomy: now at Github

After my previous post on extracting virus hosts from NCBI Taxonomy web pages, Pierre wrote:

An excellent idea and here’s my first attempt.

Here’s a count of hosts. By the way NCBI, it’s environment.

cut -f4 virus_host.tsv | sort | uniq -c

   1301 
    283 algae
    114 archaea
   4509 bacteria
      8 diatom
     51 enviroment
    267 fungi
      1 fungi| plants| invertebrates
      4 human
    761 invertebrates
    181 invertebrates| plants
      7 invertebrates| vertebrates
   3979 plants
    102 protozoa
   6834 vertebrates
 115052 vertebrates| human
     43 vertebrates| human  stool
    225 vertebrates| invertebrates
    656 vertebrates| invertebrates| human

Virus hosts from NCBI Taxonomy web pages

A Biostars question asks whether the information about virus host on web pages like this one can be retrieved using Entrez Utilities.

Pretty sure that the answer is no, unfortunately. Sometimes there’s no option but to scrape the web page, in the knowledge that this approach may break at any time. Here’s some very rough and ready Ruby code without tests or user input checks. It takes the taxonomy UID and returns the host, if there is one. No guarantees now or in the future!

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'nokogiri'
require 'open-uri'

def get_host(uid)
	url   = "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi?mode=Info&lvl=3&lin=f&keep=1&srchmode=1&unlock&id=" + uid.to_s
	doc   = Nokogiri::HTML.parse(open(url).read)
	data  = doc.xpath("//td").collect { |x| x.inner_html.split("<br>") }.flatten
	data.each do |e|
		puts $1 if e =~ /Host:\s+<\/em>(.*?)$/
	end
end

get_host(ARGV[0])

Save as taxhost.rb and supply the UID as first argument. Note: I chose 12345 off the top of my head, imagining that it was unlikely to be a virus and would make a good negative test. Turns out to be a phage!

$ ruby taxhost.rb 12249
plants
$ ruby taxhost.rb 12721
vertebrates
$ ruby taxhost.rb 11709
vertebrates| human
$ ruby taxhost.rb 12345
bacteria

Searching for the Steamer retroelement in the ocean metagenome

Location of BLAST (tblastn) hits Mya arenaria GagPol (AIE48224.1) vs GOS contigs

Location of BLAST (tblastn) hits Mya arenaria GagPol (AIE48224.1) vs GOS contigs

Last week, I was listening to episode 337 of the podcast This Week in Virology. It concerned a retrovirus-like sequence element named Steamer, which is associated with a transmissible leukaemia in soft shell clams.

At one point the host and guests discussed the idea of searching for Steamer-like sequences in the data from ocean metagenomics projects, such as the Global Ocean Sampling expedition. Sounds like fun. So I made an initial attempt, using R/ggplot2 to visualise the results.

To make a long story short: the initial BLAST results are not super-convincing, the visualisation could use some work (click image, right, for larger version) and the code/data are all public at Github, summarised in this report. It made for a fun, relatively-quick side project.