Evidence for a limit to effective peer review

I missed it first time around but apparently, back in October, Nature published a somewhat-controversial article: Evidence for a limit to human lifespan. It came to my attention in a recent tweet:

The source: a fact-check article from Dutch news organisation NRC titled “Nature article is wrong about 115 year limit on human lifespan“. NRC seem rather interested in this research article. They have published another more recent critique of the work, titled “Statistical problems, but not enough to warrant a rejection” and a discussion of that critique, Peer review post-mortem: how a flawed aging study was published in Nature.

Unfortunately, the first NRC article does itself no favours by using non-comparable x-axis scales for its charts and not really explaining very well how the different datasets (IDL and GRG) were used. Data nerds everywhere then, are wondering whether to repeat the analysis themselves and perhaps fire off a letter to Nature.

Read the rest…

Note to journals: “methodologically sound” applies to figures too

PeerJ, like PLoS ONE, aims to publish work on the basis of “soundness” (scientific and methodological) as opposed to subjective notions of impact, interest or significance. I’d argue that effective, appropriate data visualisation is a good measure of methodology. I’d also argue that on that basis, Evolution of a research field – a micro (RNA) example fails the soundness test.
Continue reading