Putting data on maps using R: easier than ever

New Zealand earthquake density 2010 - November 2016

New Zealand earthquake density 2010 – November 2016

Using R to add data to maps has been pretty straightforward for a few years now. That said, it seems easier than ever to do things like use map APIs (e.g. Google, Open Street Map), overlay quite complex data visualisations (e.g. “heatmap-style” densities) and even generate animations.

A couple of key R packages in this space: ggmap and gganimate. To illustrate, I’ve used data from the recent New Zealand earthquake to generate some static maps and an animation. Here’s the Github repository and a report. Thanks to Florian Teschner for a great ggmap tutorial which got me started.

My own work in bioinformatics to date has not (sadly!) required much analysis of geospatial data but I can see use cases in many areas – environmental microbiology, for example.

Lots of “open goodness” in the AU/NZ region

January/February are exciting months for open [data|research|science|access] proponents in our region – by which I mean Australia and New Zealand.

First, we’ve enjoyed a speaking tour by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, during which he discussed the benefits of open data several times. I was able to attend two events in Sydney in person and a third, linux.conf.au, by video stream. The events were the work of many people but in particular, Pia Waugh. Go follow her on Twitter, now.

Next – I wish I had been able to get to this one – the Open Research Conference on February 6-7, University of Auckland. I’m enjoying the high-quality live stream right now. Flying the flag for Sydney are Mat and Alex.

Not strictly under the “open” umbrella but worth a mention anyway: software carpentry is in town, February 7-8, just up the road from me at Macquarie University. Looking forward to hearing some reports from that.