50% bananas

factoid

Today in “blog posts that have spent two years in the draft folder” – “Humans are 50% banana.”

“Humans are 50% banana.”

Perhaps you have heard this statement, or one like it. It seems to be widely-quoted. As an example it’s hard to go past this article from UK tabloid The Mirror which, in addition to the banana, also informs us that “the entire internet weighs about the same as one large strawberry”. I don’t even know where to begin with that one.

A couple of years ago, between jobs and with time on my hands, I thought I’d go in search of the source for this factoid.

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Evidence for a limit to effective peer review

I missed it first time around but apparently, back in October, Nature published a somewhat-controversial article: Evidence for a limit to human lifespan. It came to my attention in a recent tweet:

The source: a fact-check article from Dutch news organisation NRC titled “Nature article is wrong about 115 year limit on human lifespan“. NRC seem rather interested in this research article. They have published another more recent critique of the work, titled “Statistical problems, but not enough to warrant a rejection” and a discussion of that critique, Peer review post-mortem: how a flawed aging study was published in Nature.

Unfortunately, the first NRC article does itself no favours by using non-comparable x-axis scales for its charts and not really explaining very well how the different datasets (IDL and GRG) were used. Data nerds everywhere then, are wondering whether to repeat the analysis themselves and perhaps fire off a letter to Nature.

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We’re only 10% human. According to…who?

Reading an interesting post at Genomes Unzipped, “Human genetics is microbial genomics“, which states:

Only 10% of cells on your “human” body are human anyway, the rest are microbial.

Have you read a sentence like that before? So have I. So has a reader who left a comment:

I was wondering if you have a source for “Only 10% of cells on your “human” body are human anyway, the rest are microbial”

It’s a good question. Everyone quotes this figure, almost no-one provides a reference. Let’s go in search of one.
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