Tag Archives: friendfeed

Some brief thoughts on the end of FriendFeed

There was a time, around 2009 or so, when almost every post at this blog was tagged “friendfeed”. So with the announcement (which frankly I expected 5 years ago) that it is to be shut down, I guess a few words are in order.

I’m thankful to FriendFeed for facilitating many of my current online friendships. It was uniquely successful in creating communities composed of people with an interest in how to do science online, not just talk about (i.e. communicate) science online. It was justly famous for bringing together research scientists with other communities: librarians in particular, people from the “tech world”, patient advocates, educators – all under the umbrella of a common interest in “open science”. We even got a publication or two out of it.

To this day I am not sure why it worked so well. One key feature was that it allowed people to coalesce around pieces of information. In contrast to other networks it was the information, presented via a sparse, functional interface, that initially brought people together, as opposed to the user profile. There was probably also a strong element of “right people in the right place at the right time.”

It’s touching that people are name-checking me on Twitter regarding the news of the shutdown, given that no trace of my FriendFeed activity remains online. Realising that my activity was getting more and more difficult to retrieve for archiving and that bugs were never going to be fixed, I opted several years ago to delete my account. The loss of my content pains me to this day, but inaccurate public representation of my activities due to poor technical implementation pains me more.

I’ve seen a few reactions along the lines of “what is all the fuss about.” How short is our collective memory. To those people: look at Facebook, Yammer or even Twitter and ask yourself where the idea of a stream of items with associated discussion came from.

Farewell then FriendFeed, pioneer tool of the online open science community. We never did find a tool quite as good as you.

Analysis of ISMB coverage at FriendFeed: 2008 – 2011

ISMB/ECCB 2011 was held between July 15-19 this year and as in previous years, FriendFeed was used to cover the meeting.

Last year, I wrote a post about how to use R to analyse the coverage. I was planning something similar for 2011 when I thought: we have 4 years of ISMB at FriendFeed now – why not look at all of them?

So I did. Read on for the details.
Read the rest…

Farewell FriendFeed. It’s been fun.

I’ve been a strong proponent of FriendFeed since its launch. Its technology, clean interface and “data first, then conversations” approach have made it a highly-successful experiment in social networking for scientists (and other groups). So you may be surprised to hear that from today, I will no longer be importing items into FriendFeed, or participating in the conversations at other feeds.

Here’s a brief explanation and some thoughts on my online activity in the coming months.
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APIs have let me down part 2/2: FriendFeed

In part 1, I described some frustrations arising out of a work project, using the Array Express API. I find that one way to deal mentally with these situations is to spend some time on a fun project, using similar programming techniques. A potential downside of this approach is that if your fun project goes bad, you’re really frustrated. That’s when it’s time to abandon the digital world, go outside and enjoy nature.

Here then, is why I decided to build another small project around FriendFeed, how its failure has led me to question the value of FriendFeed for the first time and why my time as a FriendFeed user might be up.
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APIs have let me down part 1/2: ArrayExpress

The API – Application Programming Interface – is, in principle, a wonderful thing. You make a request to a server using a URL and back come lovely, structured data, ready to parse and analyse. We’ve begun to demand that all online data sources offer an API and lament the fact that so few online biological databases do so.

Better though, to have no API at all than one which is poorly implemented and leads to frustration? I’m beginning to think so, after recent experiences on both a work project and one of my “fun side projects”. Let’s start with the work project, an attempt to mine a subset of the ArrayExpress microarray database.
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Lazy post: a Life Scientists best-of

When stuck for ideas or pressed for time, a blogger can always fall back on a round-up of activity from elsewhere on the web. Yes, it’s time for a “best of the past 14 days” from the FriendFeed Life Scientists group.

Just a slight twist to make it more exciting (?) – we’ll automate the process using the API and a little Ruby.
Read the rest…

ISMB/ECCB 2009 reports

Great to see more reports describing the use of online tools to cover scientific meetings. Here are the publications, from PLoS Computational Biology:

Live Coverage of Scientific Conferences Using Web Technologies.

Live Coverage of Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology/European Conference on Computational Biology (ISMB/ECCB) 2009.

And here’s Ally a.k.a the robo-blogger on Social Networking and Guidelines for Life Science Conferences.

Looks like we’ve started a trend, long may it continue at future meetings.