What’s in a (gene) name?

I’ve posted before on standard names (or lack thereof) for genes and proteins and in particular, the whacky names of which biologists are so fond. Hopefully they now realise that in the age of bioinformatics – where we have to find stuff easily – descriptions such as ken and barbie, scott of the antarctic or glass-bottom boat are, um, unhelpful to say the least.

So hot on the heels of my “man, you can publish anything in bioinformatics these days” post comes:

Seringhaus, M. et al. (2008).
Uncovering trends in gene naming.
Genome Biology 9:401 Abstract | DOI 10.1186/gb-2008-9-1-401

We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov’s dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future.

It’s actually a fun and informative read.

See also: FlyNome, Clever Drosophila gene names and Sonic Hedgehog Sounded Funny, at First. From the latter source: “It’s a cute name when you have stupid flies and you call it a ‘turnip,’ ” Dr. Doe said. “When it’s linked to development in humans, it’s not so cute any more.”