Musical sequences

Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists.

Far from the first time that this has been tried – but perhaps the first report in a high-impact journal.
The supplementary data include mp3 files for download. Human ThyA sounds surprisingly good.

Update: play any gene using Alf’s Greasemonkey script

6 thoughts on “Musical sequences

  1. Jonathan Badger

    Far from the first time that this has been tried – but perhaps the first report in a high-impact journal.

    I know! I even did something like this about 15 years ago as an undergrad class project, and I doubt I was the first to think of it. No chords/rhythm though. As I recall the professor thought it waa stupid/useless but was amused enough to give me a good grade on it. To think that I missed my chance to publish my great finding…

  2. nsaunders Post author

    Yes, it’s original in that it’s the first attempt to make it musical, as opposed to a bunch of random notes. I don’t buy the genome visualisation argument though – come on! It’s a bit of fun.

  3. Jonathan Badger

    Yeah, it does sound better than I recall mine sounding. And looking at the previous work it looks like both the Ohnos and Dunn/Bridges had musical sequence systems prior to mine anyway. Oh well.

  4. Pingback: More music & genes « biobits

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