Category Archives: software

Tool tip: dropbox-restore

I’m currently rather sleep-deprived and prone to doing stupid things. Like this, for example:

rsync -av ~/Dropbox /path/to/backup/directory/

where the directory /path/to/backup/directory already contains a much-older Dropbox directory. So when I set up a new machine, install Dropbox and copy the Dropbox directory back to its default location – hey! What happened to all my space? What are all these old files? Oh wait…I forgot to delete:

rsync -av --delete ~/Dropbox /path/to/backup/directory/

Now, files can be restored of course, but not when there are thousands of them and I don’t even know what’s old and new. What I want to do is restore the directories under ~/Dropbox to the state that they were in yesterday, before I stuffed up.

Luckily Chris Clark wrote dropbox-restore. It does exactly what it says on the tin. For example:

python restore.py /Camera\ Uploads 2014-07-22

Thanks Chris!

utils4bioinformatics: all those “little snippets” in one place

Over the years, I’ve written a lot of small “utility scripts”. You know the kind of thing. Little code snippets that facilitate research, rather than generate research results. For example: just what are the fields that you can use to qualify Entrez database searches?

Typically, they end up languishing in long-forgotten Dropbox directories. Sometimes, the output gets shared as a public link. No longer! As of today, “little code snippets that do (hopefully) useful things” have a new home at Github.

Also as of today: there’s not much there right now, just the aforementioned Entrez database code and output. I’m not out to change the world here, just to do a little better.

Quilt plots. Like heat maps, only…heat maps

Stephen tweets:

A "quilt plot"

A “quilt plot”


Quilt plots. Sounds interesting. The link points to a short article in PLoS ONE, containing a table and a figure. Here is Figure 1.

If you looked at that and thought “Hey, that’s a heat map!”, you are correct. That is a heat map. Let’s be quite clear about that. It’s a heat map.

So, how do the authors justify publishing a method for drawing heat maps and then calling them “quilt plots”?
Read the rest…